News Regarding Algae Bloom at Canyon Lake

Subsequent to the April Alum application, an algae bloom was observed in several coves.  As in the past, a press release was shared with the media indicating that the cause of the algae bloom in the coves was not the alum, and that the algae would likely dissipate over time.

RFP: Public Education and Outreach Support Services

The Lake Elsinore and San Jacinto Watersheds Authority (LESJWA) is requesting proposals from qualified firms for assisting LESJWA in the development and implementation of support services for a multi-year education and outreach program through community and media relations. Closed: RFP Public Education and Outreach Support Service Docuement One electronic copy of the response is to be …

Read moreRFP: Public Education and Outreach Support Services

LESJWA Summit Presentations

Presentations include: San Jacinto Watershed Fly Through | Mark Norton from LESJWA | Kurt Berchtold – Pollution Control Planning for Lake Elsinore and Canyon Lake | Jason Uhley – MS4 Permits and TMDLs: Costs and Savings through TMDL Task Force | Pat Boldt – Agricultural and Dairy Operator Nutrient Reduction in the San Jacinto Watershed | Nemesciano Ochoa – Drought Impacts on Local Lakes and Watershed | Tim Moore – What’s Next?

Alum Treatment Project

According to the Lake Elsinore & San Jacinto Watershed Authority (LESJWA), preliminary test results indicate that alum treatments conducted between September 23 and 27 in Canyon Lake have successfully improved the lake’s overall water quality by reducing phosphorous levels that can cause algae blooms and fish kills.

Water Quality Improvements Underway

Work is underway on improving water quality at Canyon Lake in order to comply with water quality standards. $500,000 has been secured from the CA Dept of Water Resources by LESJWA to help support this goal. CEQA is underway and a final lake improvement project should be announced in April 2013.

Lake Elsinore – A Success

Year after year, the lake suffered as harmful pollutants traveling through the 720-mile San Jacinto Watershed poured into Lake Elsinore, choking the lake’s oxygen supply and fueling destructive algae blooms. To make matters worse, evaporation caused lake levels to drop several feet every year. Today, the 3,330-acre-foot lake is home to more than 500,000 healthy sport fish and attracts recreational enthusiasts from throughout the region who boat, fish, camp and enjoy other watersports and outdoor activities.

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